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Patrick Welde
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How dangerous is rugby relative to other contact sports?
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This is an excellent, and much-debated, question. Rugby has two things going against it that drastically shape most people's perceptions regarding how dangerous it is:
1. There is no active substitution
2. There is no blocking

When a player gets hurt in football or hockey (other high-contact sports), that player is quickly replaced, as substitution is a normal part of the game. In rugby, on the other hand, the turnover time for replacing an injured player takes much longer, as the referee will usually let play continue until it stops naturally (unless the injured player is right in the thick of things).

At the same time, there is no blocking in rugby. The player with the ball receives no protection from his teammates, unlike in American football where the ball carrier is at least temporarily protected by teammates.

In reality, rugby is no less dangerous than other contact sports-- there's just a different type of risk involved.
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Correct, but the University of Pretoria has done some studies and the same bone impact breaks that you get from rugby can only be matched by rodeo and cases where people were stampeded by elaphants. True. But the game is save as long as you have Boksmart coaches that prepares you to be mentally and physicly fit.
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Agreed with both of the answers above, but you have to remember it is a very aggressive and constant sport. With any sport you play it make take awhile to adjust to the rules and ways of play. For instance a person going out on the pitch for the first time may be susceptible or pron to more injuries rather than a man that has been playing for awhile. There are strict rules that permit someone from tackling harshly. For instance you cannot clothesline or pick someone up and slam them into the ground, I mean you can do anything you wan't technically but you will be penalized for it. As being compared to other sports it involves more contact with continuous play, but if you learn how to play it's truly a sport that grows on you.
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I love to watch rugby, but there's a couple of things that make me feel uneasy about the violence of this sport.
Mostly the stuations at the rucks where players get squashed by others while falling on the gound, added by unintentional kicks and punches with knees, elbows and heads. I wonder how many players have broken their spine.
There a sad story about an Ivory Coast player who became crippled during a world cup match in South Africa in 1995. The can only move his head now and a bit of one of the arms.
His comments about himself are really depressing. Things like "I am not even able to put an end to my life because I cannot move." It seems that he hasn't even gotten support from the IRB or other institutions related to rugby.

The rules banning touching necks or doing spear tackes make rugby safer. However they're not always enforced because the referee cannot see everything at the increasingly high speed that professional rugby is played.
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